Become a IDP Mentor

WHAT IS A MENTOR?

A mentor is a loyal adviser, teacher, or coach.  A mentor should make a long-term commitment to an intern’s professional growth.  If possible, the mentor should not work in the same office as the intern, so that the intern can gain useful insight into the daily work experience.

A mentor must be an architect; however, the mentor does not need to be registered in the jurisdiction where the intern is located.

BECOME AN IDP MENTOR

Working with an Intern section on NCARB’s Web site.  You can also get help finding an IDP Mentor.

A MENTOR’S ROLE

An intern and mentor should meet periodically to review experience reports submitted for the IDP.  A mentor is also a resource for supplemental experience opportunities and can provide guidance to enhance an intern’s professional growth.

EXPECTATIONS FOR A MENTOR

An intern and mentor should discuss expectations and come to an agreement on such issues as: the length of the relationship; frequency and types of meetings and other activities; and how to give each other feedback.

Confidentiality is an absolute must, for both mentor and intern, with regard to personal and professional issues.

See more here.

RESPONSIBILTIES

IDP Mentors must sign off on their intern’s reporting forms to verify that the intern earns the credit they submit.  IDP Mentors are also responsible for suggesting supplementary education activities; conferring, if necessary, with their intern’s supervisor; and providing guidance to enhance their intern’s professional growth.  In order to fulfill these roles, the mentor should be familiar with state licensure requirements and the current NCARB IDP Guidelines, and should meet regularly with their intern’s at least quarterly.  Mentors and interns can engage in a mentoring relationship in-person, via the internet or via phone.

SUPERVISORS AS MENTORS

Often, interns ask their supervisor to be their mentor.  According the NCARB IDP Guidelines, a supervisor may be a mentor, but it is not the best scenario for the intern.  Ideally, the mentor will work in a separate firm from the intern in order to remain objective and offer more diversity to the intern’s training experience.  A mentor does not need to be located near their intern but must be familiar with the state board’s licensing requirements where their intern is located.